Business Photography

Brand Imagery: Collaboration Between Clients, Photographers and Marketing Firms

While I most often work directly with clients, I have also developed relationships with Indianapolis marketing firms to help them create brand imagery for their customers. Such was the case for Wharton & Power Insurance. They were working with Fresh Figs Marketing to rebrand as a formal partnership between two long-time colleagues. While they were updating their digital and brick and mortar look, they also needed fresh headshots for their new website.

“Team headshots are an important part of brand imagery,” states Jennifer Riley Simone, President of Fresh Figs Marketing. “Giving potential clients a glimpse into the personality of the team as a whole, as well as the individuals they would be working with, can help them feel comfortable about reaching out. Also, taking the shots in the office can help set a tone for the customer experience. W&P is a boutique independent shop, and I wanted that vibe to come through in the headshots.”

Portrait photograph by Paul D'Andrea

Wharton & Power had moved into a new stylish space in 2018, so I scouted around to find a backdrop that would provide a more relaxed feel than the typical insurance headshots. I chose their front window, which offered a nice view of the brick building across the street and set a community tone. Wharton & Power purposely chose to relocate to the Village of West Clay business community, so we subtly highlighted that in the headshots. I had worked with the Wharton half of the team before, taking portraits for their last website redesign with Fresh Figs. Then and now, it was important that I create images that could be easily replicated as staff come and go. Choosing the outdoor background allowed me to achieve this goal, knowing that those buildings would there the next time headshots were needed.

Portrait photograph by Paul D'Andrea

Since these portraits were specifically for the new website, my goal was to capture the individual as they supported the company brand. The small, personalized focus came out immediately as I began to shoot. The team was relaxed and friendly, not stuffy at all, so it was easy to capture that approachable look. Neither Jennifer nor I had told them what to wear since we wanted them to be comfortable, but they ended up being coordinated which looks great on the website.

Scott Wharton shared his thoughts on our time together:

Portrait photograph by Paul D'Andrea

“Paul went above and beyond for us during our photoshoot. He ended up having to come out twice to accommodate travel schedules. The first round, he arrived on time, took the images quickly, and gave us great pictures. Unfortunately, the second shoot was not so smooth. Paul ended up having to hang out with us for 45 minutes while one of our team members fought traffic. We were grateful that he made room in his schedule for this snafu. He was tolerant, patient and yet again gave us great photos.”

Portrait photograph by Paul D'Andrea

Working with a client again years later is fun for me, especially when I see improvement. The images for the 2018 go around were more refined than my 2014 shoot. I can see my techniques evolving, allowing me to better capture the personalities of my clients. Also, as time goes on, we can collectively see that headshots taken 10 years ago when LinkedIn was newer are more of the standard formal look. As social media has evolved, so has the headshot, where more relaxed and personable images are required to stand out in the sea of faces. I enjoy this new style of brand imagery because my favorite part of my job getting my clients to bring out our their particular selves in our shoots.

Collaborating with marketing firms allows me to play a part in shaping the look of a brand as a whole, not just the individual. From professional headshots, to location and event imagery, I can bring a personalized visual element to the overall brand. A team that includes the agency, the client and the photographer can offer a truly personalized look to a company image. If your team is looking for a photographer, contact me here.

Client Highlight: Sapphire Strategy Professional Headshots and Brand Photography

Having worked in Indianapolis for over 20 years, I get many opportunities to see friends and colleagues evolve and grow. Such is the case with Sapphire Strategy. I have known their founder, Jenn Golding, for many years now and I was happy to work with her when she opened her consulting firm. Recently, we got together again to take professional headshots of her team, as well as take some brand photography in their new office space.

Sapphire Strategy is located in The Union 525, a tech-focused co-working space in Downtown Indianapolis. The building has a cool vibe and served as a perfect backdrop for our photos. These more urban-looking places offer a lot of visual variety with unique architectural details in one building. The Sapphire Strategy Team and I wandered around the space, finding seating and standing areas, desks, windows, half walls and even wall murals to use as backgrounds for their photos.

Variety also has challenges, however. Each new area of the building could mean a change in light quality, color and tone. And, different spaces have different vibes – warm and inviting to cold and austere can both be in the same building. It was important that we keep in mind the look we wanted as we chose the environments.

Creating good composition for the photos can be challenging in these spaces too, especially for professional headshots where we want the focus to be on the person, not the background. I am always looking for a pleasing composition to place people into; busy environments can make it hard to create a visually balanced image. Even though for larger shoots I scope out the venue beforehand, this issue must be managed on-site in real time. Here is where having experience in understanding how different lighting and backgrounds affect the final outcome ensures a productive photoshoot. We certainly do not want to have to come back to redo the images!

Beyond showing their working environment, another goal was to show the vibe of the company. They are a fun loving and hard working company and their corporate photos needed to show that personality. Sometimes I take photos at more formal companies where it can be hard to get people to let go a bit and not look so stiff. This group had no problem looking happy and comfortable –at times had a hard time getting just smiles rather than laughs!

According to Jenn Golding, “When we work together, I give Paul very basic guidance and a shot list to let him know what I am thinking. Then I let his creativity go. He takes pictures all day and I don’t, so I trust his judgment. I like his eye for environment, headshots, office shots, etc. I let him know what I need but then tell him – ‘If you see anything cool, go for it.’ I’ve been working with him for years, and have always been happy with the result.  For this shoot, we needed headshots, office shots, team photos and shots of individuals and our new location.  We will use the photos in social media, website, email marketing, and collateral.”

Professional headshot and brand photography are central to communicating the personality of your business to your customers. If you are looking to launch a business or just need a refresh, you can contact me here.

 

Representing Your Company’s Personality through Professional Business Photography

Customers are looking for authenticity in a business, but they will also pay the most attention to what stands out. Your company is as unique as the people who built it and how it is represented through marketing images goes a long way in communicating your business’ personality to your customers. Images show the many faces of a company: employees, leadership, ambiance and culture. A collection of professional business photography gives customers a sense of what to expect when they choose to work with you.

In my years of experience working with many companies to create stock libraries and professional headshots, I’ve found several key characteristics they are looking to communicate in their images: dependability, creativity, friendliness and confidence.

Conveying Confidence and Dependability

Lawyers, banks, and advisers are often looking to convey they are trustworthy. The best way I have found to craft that dependable, confident vibe is through serious-toned images. Darker colors, solid backdrops free of distracting detail, a crossed-arms pose—all these little details add up to say to the viewer “I am serious”.

Professional Business photography

Trust is a key component our client shown above wanted to convey—behind him is a large bank door with just enough detail to look impressive and unique, but not distracting. The dramatic lighting, with hard edges, rather than a soft glow was set to create more contrasts.

Feeling Friendly

Many companies who spend a lot of time with their clients want to appear friendly and easy to work with. Bright or natural backgrounds create an open feel and convey a happier mood.

The two employee portraits shown above are real estate agents, and their smiling faces reassure the viewer they are congenial people who are easy to work with. The lighting is softer here, and there’s a lot of light—shadows would convey a heavier mood.

Professional Business photography | group

These real estate agents pictured outside have a local, at-home feel—the scenery evokes the thought of neighborhoods and backyards, which of course lends itself to what theses agents do. The lighting here is natural, and shadows, though present, are much softer and blend together rather than stand out dramatically.

That Creative Touch

Companies looking to stand out from the crowd, such as marketing and tech companies, often want fun, more detailed pictures that are particular to their messaging, logos, or work.

Professional Business photography | group

I did a series of images for a marketing company called “Creative Quarterback”, and we decided to theme all their website photos around their name. Correlating their branding and photography allows their message to sink deeper, drawing connections between their website text and the images, making their company more memorable.

 

In translating a company’s personality to their photos, I do the heavy lifting for my clients, using my own creative eye and experience to develop the perfect visual. I work closely with my clients not only to get a sense of their vibe, but also discussing with them what they want to convey. If you are looking for professional business photography to help you bring your company personality in front of your customers, you can contact me here.

Crafting a Business Image

Wherever you are representing yourself, be it online or print media, you will need to think about your business image. Visuals create a window to the personality and tone of a company. Headshots introduce your team and onsite environmental or editorial portraits evoke a sense of hard work and skill. Done well, photos can communicate volumes to your clients about you, and present a polished, professional look you aim for in person.

I have worked with many companies to create stock libraries and professional headshots uniquely tailored to their needs. I do the heavy lifting for my clients in crafting their business image, using my own creative eye and experience to develop the perfect photo. However, it is vital to know what you want, and to communicate your expectations with your photographer so the resulting images will better represent what you pictured. The following pointers will help you figure out those expectations.

brand photography

Uses Far and Wide

To start, you need to know where you will be using the images. Do you need team shots? Marketing materials? Website stock photography? Knowing the mediums will help your photographer know how to approach each photoshoot.

professional headshots

Style and Story-telling

Images tell the story of what your business is—if you are a tech company, your visuals should look drastically different than a landscaping contractor’s. There are three styles I use in photoshoots: classic, environmental, and editorial. Classic style, a straight-on shot with a distraction-free background, is great for people-driven companies, like HR and marketing. Editorial style captures workers and processes in action, and is the perfect way to highlight product and service-driven businesses.

Environmental style allows subjects to be shot at visually interesting locations, outdoors or in the office. I recommend environmental portraits to those who have interesting office spaces. You can refer to the process of professional headshots for a more in-depth look.

Personality and Backdrops

Talk with your photographer beforehand to determine what personality vibe you’re going for so he or she will know what tools to bring and how to shoot the pictures. Are you a law firm or bank? You may want images that communicate competence and trustworthiness. Are you a tech company? Creativity and ingenuity might be your leaning. Plain color backdrops can convey a strong message: white and bright colors have an open, inviting energy, while dark backdrops look more serious and dramatic.

Interesting offices provide a lot of visual fodder for stock photography and headshot backgrounds. I always advise my clients who have great office spaces to showcase their work environment, not just for clients, but also for prospective employees. Refer to my blog about using office spaces for examples.

Bringing a professional photographer on as an integrated partner can save time and provide you with consistent quality work. Please contact me for your business photography needs, whether it is portraits, professional headshots, group photos, or unique brand photography.

Keeping Your Team’s Professional Headshots Up to Date

Team and employee professional headshots on your company website connect faces to your business and help build your brand online. But businesses change, move locations and acquire new prospects. How do you keep your company image up to date with your current team composition? In my many years of corporate photography work, I have come up with several solutions.

Employee Group Photos

Group photos pose a challenge for businesses as employees come and go. It can take extensive scheduling and coordination to get everyone together every time there are new hires. However, with the power of Photoshop, one group photo can be taken and then edited as time goes on. New employees can be photographed individually against the same background with the same light settings, then added into the picture with much less hassle.

updated business group photo

Individual Employee Headshots

With individual headshots, scheduling time for new hires to have their portrait taken can be simplified by integrating your company’s photographer into your onboarding routine. I have several clients for whom I am part of their new employee orientation process—the portraits are done right from the start and no extra scheduling is necessary.

I have other clients who make me a part of their yearly company-wide meeting. I provide portraits for whoever wants them during a lunch break. Again, this combines two events into one, and assures most employees can get portraits with the least trouble possible.

Moving Offices

Company growth is often marked with a change in headquarters, and moving into a new space is the perfect opportunity to update your professional portraits. I like using my clients’ office spaces as backdrops for their headshots—often they design their own spaces to reflect their business personality and brand. It makes sense to refresh the company look to match the new environment. It is also a great PR opportunity to show off your space and talk about the exciting changes happening in your business.

Dittoe_greta before_professional headshots

Previous Office

 

Dittoe_Greta_professional headshots

New Office

Consistency in photography is key for all my clients. Their professional headshots and group photos across time need to have the same look. I light them similarly, using identical camera settings, and review previous photos to keep the same feel even though backdrops and ambient lighting may differ.

If you need anything from simple business portraits to unique brand photography, I am comfortable taking professional headshots in the field or the studio. You can contact me here.

The Process of Professional Headshots

Professional headshots tell the story of who you are and what you do. Great portraits aren’t effortless; there is a process to creating those photos that work perfectly for your marketing materials, website, or professional profile. You will need to choose the right style of professional portraits, prepare and plan for the photoshoot, and communicate with your photographer your needs and vision.

Professional headshots come in three styles: classic, environmental, and editorial.

Classic: This style keeps it simple—a straight-on shot with a distraction-free background. This look is great for professional profiles or employee headshots. Either an on-location or color backdrop can serve as the background. A solid color backdrop makes team photos easy to replicate when you hire new members. I always talk through with my clients what colors and backgrounds best suit their brand or business, as they are instrumental in conveying a certain feel to your audience.

Environmental: This style is well-suited for visually interesting locations. If your office has unique architectural features, cool outdoor spaces, or eye-catching artwork, taking your portrait on-site will add character to your headshots. Conversely, plain offices are ill suited to environmental shots. The same goes for messy spaces; straightening up is essential for professional photos. Overall, it is important to know what feel the background will convey, and choose your location wisely. Portraits should match your type of business; it makes sense for a landscaping architect to be outdoors, and a tech startup company to be in a cool office space. Some current office design trends include neat lighting and old wood, which end up making nice backdrops for in-office portraits. I like to arrive at locations early to scout unique backdrops—attention to detail is key to making your portraits memorable.

Professional Headshots and Work Environment Photography | Paul D'AndreaEditorial: This style focuses on your employees “in action.” If your business makes physical products or delivers services “on location” in interesting places, this can be the perfect option. Similar to environmental, editorial style is also not recommended for plain offices as the images will feature the surrounding space. If an office-based business wants editorial portraits, I may ask them to bring a few of their clients and/or partners into the office during the shoot. This allows us to take shots of their team in meetings, on calls, working in groups, etc.

Editing

Editing is essential to create a finished photograph. My philosophy of photo editing is to remove distractions from the frame and ensure the subjects look their best. After some minor color and lighting adjustments, I work with my clients to choose the best portraits. I then edit them more heavily, removing specks and stray hairs, softening shiny skin, or reducing the number of wires on a desk. Major changes I can make include taking a subject from one background and dropping them onto another, or even taking just a head or tie and placing it on another picture. With larger changes sometimes there are extra costs; it’s much easier to wear a tie than for me to photoshop a tie on you.

Communicating expectations clearly is vital no matter what style you choose. Miscommunication, or neglecting to explain your vision means you may not be happy with your portraits. When your photographer understands how you will use the images, and what specific look you want, the end result will better represent what you pictured.

Looking for an experienced professional headshot photographer? You can contact me at 317-443-3792 or send me a message.

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